Stay Healthy When Your Traveling

It’s always important to take care of your health, but there are additional concerns to keep in mind when you’re traveling.

Whether you’re taking a quick trip with your family or studying abroad for several months, it’s easier to get sick when you’re in a new place because your body hasn’t had a chance to adjust to the food, water, and air in a new environment. Traveling can bring you in contact with things that your body isn’t used to.

Altitude sickness is caused by dry air, a decrease in oxygen, and low barometric pressure when you travel to a higher altitude than you’re used to. As a result, you may have problems, such as headaches, dehydration, and shortness of breath. Some people are affected at 5,000 feet (1,524 meters), but others aren’t affected until they reach altitudes of 10,000 feet (3,048 meters) or more. Find out what altitude you’re traveling to before you go to see if altitude sickness could be a problem.

The topic of diarrhea may seem gross, but it can be a serious problem. Traveler’s diarrhea, known as turista, often occurs when a foreign type of bacteria enters your digestive tract, usually when you eat contaminated food or water. The best way to prevent turista is to be very careful of the food you eat and the water you drink on the road.

So what foods are safe to eat? Any foods that have been boiled are generally safe, as well as fruits and vegetables that have to be peeled before eating. Avoid eating uncooked or undercooked meat or meat that is not cooked just prior to serving.

You’ve probably heard that you shouldn’t drink the water in some countries overseas, but did you know why? Water supplies in many developing countries are not treated in the same way as water supplies in developed countries; various bacteria, viruses, and parasites are commonly found in the water. Many experts suggest you drink only bottled water when traveling.

Even if you watch what you eat and drink and get enough rest while you’re traveling, you might still get sick. The good news is that you’ll probably be able to find competent medical care. The key is knowing where to go. Most travel guides suggest you go to a hospital where English is spoken or U.S.-trained doctors can be found. For this reason, it’s wise to always carry a written copy of your medical history with you.

Article Source: http://kidshealth.org/teen/safety/safebasics/travel_tips.html#

 

This entry was posted in Blog. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


four − = 3

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>